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Where To Apply Estrogen Patch

Benefits Of The Estrogen Patch

How to Apply & Remove Transdermal Patch (Fentanyl) | Medication Administration for Nursing Students

For many women, finding the right HT can be confusing, given that most menopause hormone therapies, including those at Evernow, are available in the form of a patch, pill, or cream. Whatâs more, some women may require estrogen-only therapy, while others will require a combination of estrogen and progesterone.

While it’s not the best choice for everyone, general benefits of the patch include:

What Is This Medication

ESTRADIOL reduces the number and severity of hot flashes due to menopause. It may also help relieve the symptoms of menopause, such as vaginal irritation, dryness, or pain during sex. It can also be used to prevent osteoporosis after menopause. It works by increasing levels of the hormone estrogen in the body. This medication is an estrogen hormone.

This medicine may be used for other purposes ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

COMMON BRAND NAME: Alora, Climara, DOTTI, Esclim, Estraderm, FemPatch, LYLLANA, Menostar, Minivelle, Vivelle, Vivelle-Dot

Article Content 3 Mins Read

  • What is an Estrogen Patch?
  • Benefits of an Estrogen Patch
  • 1. Easy medication delivery
  • 3. Avoiding the GI tract
  • 4. Lower doses = lower risk
  • 5. Reduces the risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis
  • 6. May have a protective effect on the brain

Menopausal hormone therapy comes in various forms. Hormones can be delivered to your body via the vaginal route or in the form of a pill, cream, or patch.

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Avoiding The Gi Tract

Absorbing estrogen via a patch instead of by pill means the estrogen bypasses your gastrointestinal tract. When you take oral estrogen tablets, your liver and intestines try to break down some of the medication before the body can absorb the estrogen into the bloodstream and deliver it where it is needed. Using a transdermal medication, like the estradiol patch, bypasses this first pass by the liver, more quickly distributing the medication to the rest of the body. Bypassing the liver and intestines also reduces your risk of developing gallbladder disease or affecting liver function.

What May Interact With This Medication

Progesterone Shots and Estrogen Patches...Oh My!

Do not take this medication with any of the following:

This medication may also interact with the following:

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

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Uses Of Estradiol Transdermal Biweekly Patch:

  • It is used to put off soft, brittle bones in women after change of life.
  • It is used to prevent or lower the signs of the change of life .
  • It is used to add estrogen to the body when the ovaries have been taken out or do not work the right way.
  • It may be given to you for other reasons. Talk with the doctor.

Do You Have A Question

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Where Should I Wear My Estradiol Patch And How Often Should I Change It

Q:Ive been given estradiol patches by my doctor, but Im not sure how long I should wear them, or if theres any specific location to wear them. Does it matter where theyre placed? What if they come off?

A: Estradiol patches are best worn on hip, low belly, and buttock areas. Be sure to rotate sites to avoid skin irritation. Some patches are changed once per week, others twice per week it depends on the brand, so check with your pharmacist or review the literature that comes with the patch. Transdermal estrogen patches generally stick to the skin fairly well, but they vary in size and the adhesives used, so individual patients may experience more problems with one than another. We encourage you to try different places, and if the brand you are using just wont stay on, you can request another brand.

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What Should I Know About Storage And Disposal Of This Medication

Do you recommend a hormone patch for menopausal women?

Keep estradiol patches sealed in their original pouches and out of reach of children. Store the patches at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture .

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA’s Safe Disposal of Medicines website for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location â one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach.

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What Should I Discuss With My Healthcare Provider Before Using Estradiol Transdermal

You should not use estradiol if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • unusual vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by a doctor
  • endometriosis or uterine fibroid tumors
  • high levels of calcium in your blood or
  • hereditary angioedema .

Using estradiol may increase your risk of cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Talk with your doctor about this risk.

Estradiol can slow breast milk production. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

What Is Estrogen Therapy

Estrogen therapy, generally called hormone therapy when combined with a progestogen, is an effective treatment for menopausal and perimenopausal symptoms.

There are several types of estrogen made by the body that can be supplemented, including estrone , estradiol , and estriol .

Most women can safely begin taking estrogen therapy once they are in perimenopause or menopause and are displaying the symptoms of reduced or fluctuating estrogen. Your doctor can help you determine your eligibility based on your symptoms and some other key questions about your medical history. If your symptoms are bothering you, estrogen therapy is worth considering given its efficacy at diminishing menopause symptoms.

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What Should I Avoid While Using Estradiol Transdermal

Avoid smoking. It can greatly increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack while using estradiol.

Grapefruit may interact with estradiol and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products.

Avoid using creams, lotions, or powders on the skin where you apply the patch, or it may not stick to your skin.

Estradot 50 Micrograms/24 Hours Transdermal Patch

Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol transdermal system

This information is intended for use by health professionals

Estradot® 50 micrograms/24 hours, transdermal patch.

5 cm2 patch containing 0.78 mg estradiol with a release rate of 50 micrograms estradiol per 24 hours.

For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1.

Transdermal patch.

Rectangular patch with rounded corners, comprising a pressure-sensitive adhesive layer containing estradiol, with a translucent polymeric backing on one side and a protective liner on the other.

Hormone replacement therapy for oestrogen deficiency symptoms in postmenopausal women.

Prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women at high risk of future fractures who are intolerant of, or contraindicated for, other medicinal products approved for the prevention of osteoporosis .

The experience treating women older than 65 years is limited.

Dosage

The transdermal patch is applied twice weekly, i.e. every three to four days.

Oestrogen deficiency symptoms:

Estradot is available in five strengths: 25, 37.5, 50, 75 and 100. For initiation and continuation of treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration should be used. Depending on the clinical response the dose can then be adjusted to the patient’s individual needs. If, after three months, there is insufficient response in the form of alleviated symptoms, the dose can be increased. If symptoms of overdose arise the dose must be decreased.

Prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis:

General instructions

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What Are Some Side Effects That I Need To Call My Doctor About Right Away

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash hives itching red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever wheezing tightness in the chest or throat trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking unusual hoarseness or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of liver problems like dark urine, feeling tired, not hungry, upset stomach or stomach pain, light-colored stools, throwing up, or yellow skin or eyes.
  • Signs of gallbladder problems like pain in the upper right belly area, right shoulder area, or between the shoulder blades yellow skin or eyes fever with chills bloating or very upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Signs of a pancreas problem like very bad stomach pain, very bad back pain, or very bad upset stomach or throwing up.
  • Signs of high blood pressure like very bad headache or dizziness, passing out, or change in eyesight.
  • Weakness on 1 side of the body, trouble speaking or thinking, change in balance, drooping on one side of the face, or blurred eyesight.
  • Eyesight changes or loss, bulging eyes, or change in how contact lenses feel.
  • A lump in the breast, breast pain or soreness, or nipple discharge.
  • Vaginal itching or discharge.

What Is An Estrogen Patch

Estrogen patches are small sticker-like adhesives that are embedded with estrogen to allow for direct skin absorption. They can be dosed to be changed weekly or twice weekly and are a preferred method of hormone replacement for many women. Like other forms of hormone replacement therapy , patches reduce hot flashes and night sweats, improve mood swings and quality of sleep, and help clear menopausal brain fog. But what else can HRT patches do for you?

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What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Estradiol Transdermal

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives difficult breathing swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Remove the skin patch and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • heart attack symptoms –chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating
  • increased blood pressure –severe headache, blurred vision, pounding in your neck or ears, anxiety, nosebleed
  • signs of a stroke –sudden numbness or weakness , sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance
  • signs of a blood clot –sudden vision loss, stabbing chest pain, feeling short of breath, coughing up blood, pain or warmth in one or both legs
  • swelling or tenderness in your stomach
  • unusual vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain
  • memory problems, confusion, unusual behavior or
  • high levels of calcium in your blood –nausea, vomiting, constipation, increased thirst or urination, muscle weakness, bone pain, lack of energy.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache, back pain
  • stuffy nose, sinus pain, sore throat
  • vaginal itching or discharge, changes in your menstrual periods, breakthrough bleeding
  • bloating, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting
  • redness or irritation where the patch was worn
  • thinning scalp hair or
  • fluid retention .

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What Do I Need To Tell My Doctor Before I Take Estradiol Transdermal Biweekly Patch

Contraceptive Patch aka Birth Control Patch
  • If you are allergic to estradiol transdermal biweekly patch any part of estradiol transdermal biweekly patch or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.
  • If you have ever had a very bad or life-threatening reaction called angioedema. Signs may be swelling of the hands, face, lips, eyes, tongue, or throat trouble breathing trouble swallowing unusual hoarseness.
  • If you have had any of these health problems: Bleeding disorder, blood clots, a higher risk of having a blood clot, breast cancer, liver problems or liver tumor, heart attack, stroke, or a tumor where estrogen makes it grow.
  • If you have eyesight problems like loss of eyesight from blood vessel problems in the eye.
  • If you have thickening of the endometrium .
  • If you have unexplained vaginal bleeding.
  • If you are pregnant or may be pregnant. Do not take estradiol transdermal biweekly patch if you are pregnant.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with estradiol transdermal biweekly patch.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take estradiol transdermal biweekly patch with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

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What Should I Avoid While Using Estradiol Patch

Avoid smoking. It can greatly increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack while using estradiol.

Grapefruit may interact with estradiol and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products.

Avoid using creams, lotions, or powders on the skin where you apply the patch, or it may not stick to your skin.

How To Use Hrt Patches

HRT patches stay on all the time. You change them twice a week, always on the same day so you have one on for 3 days and one on for 4 days. For example, you can change on a Monday and a Thursday and then on a Monday again etc., or Tuesday and Friday and then Tuesday again, etc. Some patients tell us that they set the alarm on their phone to remind them when to change. There should not be a break between one patch and the next.

Stick the patch onto a hairless area of skin below your waist. Most women prefer to wear the patch on their thigh or bottom:

  • Apply your patch to clean, dry, cool skin as soon as you open the protective pouch.
  • You can wear your patch under loose clothing.
  • Dont apply your patch on or near your breasts.
  • Dont put it on top of cuts, spots, or anywhere the skin is irritated.
  • Dont use cream, moisturiser, or talc before applying your patch.
  • Dont apply your patch on the same area of skin twice in a row.
  • Dont wear your patch under elasticated areas or a tight waistband.

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Estradiol Patch Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives difficult breathing swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Remove the skin patch and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • heart attack symptoms–chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating

  • increased blood pressure–severe headache, blurred vision, pounding in your neck or ears, anxiety, nosebleed

  • signs of a stroke–sudden numbness or weakness , sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance

  • signs of a blood clot–sudden vision loss, stabbing chest pain, feeling short of breath, coughing up blood, pain or warmth in one or both legs

  • swelling or tenderness in your stomach

  • unusual vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain

  • memory problems, confusion, unusual behavior or

  • high levels of calcium in your blood–nausea, vomiting, constipation, increased thirst or urination, muscle weakness, bone pain, lack of energy.

Common side effects of Estradiol Patch may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What Form Does This Medication Come In

Hormonal Methods

50 µg Each thin, oval, multilayer, transparent, 20 cm² transdermal therapeutic system contains 4.1 mg of estradiol hemihydrate equivalent to 4 mg of estradiol-17 for continuous delivery of 50 µg per day. Nonmedicinal ingredients: acrylic copolymer and d–tocopherol.

75 µg Each thin, oval, multilayer, transparent, 30 cm² transdermal therapeutic system contains 6.2 mg of estradiol hemihydrate equivalent to 6 mg of estradiol-17 for continuous delivery of 75 µg per day. Nonmedicinal ingredients: acrylic copolymer and d–tocopherol.

100 µg Each thin, oval, multilayer, transparent, 40 cm² transdermal therapeutic system contains 8.3 mg of estradiol hemihydrate equivalent to 8 mg of estradiol-17 for continuous delivery of 100 µg per day. Nonmedicinal ingredients: acrylic copolymer and d–tocopherol.

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Transdermal Estradiol May Cause Side Effects Tell Your Doctor If Any Of These Symptoms Are Severe Or Do Not Go Away:

  • redness or irritation of the skin that was covered by the estradiol patch
  • vaginal discharge
  • back, neck, or muscle pain
  • runny nose or congestion
  • darkening of skin on face
  • unwanted hair growth
  • rash, blisters on skin, or other skin changes
  • swelling, of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing

Transdermal estradiol may increase your risk of developing cancer of the ovaries and gallbladder disease that may need to be treated with surgery. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using transdermal estradiol.

Transdermal estradiol may cause growth to slow or stop early in children who use large doses for a long time. Your child’s doctor will monitor her carefully during her treatment with transdermal estradiol. Talk to your child’s doctor about the risks of giving this medication to your child.

Transdermal estradiol may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while using this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online or by phone .

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